Bauhaus Design Series

Bauhaus Design: Historical Significance & Inspiration

The Bauhaus was founded in 1919, in the city of Weimar by German architect Walter Gropius (1883–1969). Its core objective was a radical concept: to reimagine the material world to reflect the unity of all the arts. The school moved to Dessau in 1925 and then to Berlin in 1932, after which Bauhaus — under constant harassment by the Nazis — finally closed in 1933.

Bauhaus design was revolutionary for its day. It transformed the way the world looked at design. Bauhaus sought to combine the fine arts with crafts by closing the schism between art and industry. Before this school of design and its design philosophy came into being, things termed “fine arts” — such as design and architecture — were routinely held in higher regard than craftsmanship. Craftsmanship included disciplines like painting, printing or woodworking.

Consequently, a broad variety of visual arts were encompassed in Bauhaus design, and were merged with workmanship to create a utopian design philosophy based on celebrating the aesthetic with the practical.

Approximately 100 years after its inception, Bauhaus still remains a highly influential force in design and beyond. It demonstrates what’s possible when designers combine minimalism and mass production.

Bauhaus Design: Historical Significance & Inspiration

The Bauhaus was founded in 1919, in the city of Weimar by German architect Walter Gropius (1883–1969). Its core objective was a radical concept: to reimagine the material world to reflect the unity of all the arts. The school moved to Dessau in 1925 and then to Berlin in 1932, after which Bauhaus — under constant harassment by the Nazis — finally closed in 1933.

Bauhaus design was revolutionary for its day. It transformed the way the world looked at design. Bauhaus sought to combine the fine arts with crafts by closing the schism between art and industry. Before this school of design and its design philosophy came into being, things termed “fine arts” — such as design and architecture — were routinely held in higher regard than craftsmanship. Craftsmanship included disciplines like painting, printing or woodworking.

Consequently, a broad variety of visual arts were encompassed in Bauhaus design, and were merged with workmanship to create a utopian design philosophy based on celebrating the aesthetic with the practical.

Approximately 100 years after its inception, Bauhaus still remains a highly influential force in design and beyond. It demonstrates what’s possible when designers combine minimalism and mass production.

Characteristics of Bauhaus Design which resonate with MonicaArts’ process & aesthetic:

  • Refined simplicity
  • Modernity & minimalism
  • Streamlined aesthetics
  • Conducive to mass production
  • Form Follows Function
  • Retains integrity of materials
Anni Albers Textile, Tate Museum, London
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